#204: What’s So Amazing About Grace?

If You Have to Ask, You Don't "Get It"

We continue our experiment for the new year – a “Faith Friday” Spiritual Foundations edition of the Ray Edwards Show. Please let me know if you like these and want them to continue. If they are serving you, I’ll keep publishing them.

Episode 204

Sometimes I am asked, “Ray, why are you so hung up on a basic teaching like ‘grace’? What’s so amazing about Grace? Didn’t you go to Sunday School?” In this episode I share:

  • Why a revelation of the True Gospel of Grace is so important to you.
  • The secret to living without fear of death.
  • Why you can be sure the Lord is “with you”, no matter what.
  • How to know you’re not “out of fellowship” with God.
  • The reason and nature of “schizophrenic Christianity” – and what we must do about it.
  • The hidden factor that can rob you of your ability to receive God’s goodness, blessings and favor in your life.
  • What “your part” is in the relationship with God.

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18 thoughts on “#204: What’s So Amazing About Grace?

  1. Keep them coming Ray. In today’s business world and the world in general there is a huge lack in talking about our spiritual life. You have the gift and need to keep sharing it.

  2. I enjoyed your podcast on what’s amazing about grace. Keep it up as we tend to distance ourselves when it comes to spiritual matters especially the cross. I have a question, if a believer knows it’s all about grace but continues in their sin, then what?

  3. Ray – Thanks for sharing your views. I always appreciate people who put effort into reading the Bible. If as you say, all of your past, current, and future sins are already forgiven, why did Jesus suggest at Matt 6:9-14 , that Christians were to pray to the Father that he “forgive us” (v12), and that if we weren’t forgiving towards others, he wouldn’t forgive us (v14)? Why pray for something we already have? And if we already have it, how is it possible that “he wouldn’t forgive us,” based on our behavior of not being forgiving?

    • Sam, thanks for your comments. I think it might be worth considering this passage more carefully. WAS Jesus giving instructions to Christians? Or was he teaching His Jewish disciples how to pray? Remember, He hadn’t yet been crucified, buried, and resurrected. As we read Scripture, we need to consider:who was the original audience? How would THEY have “heard” these words? In this case, they wouldn’t have had any concept of Christ’s forgiveness and the gift of grace given through His death and resurrection.

      • Hi Ray – Yes, Jesus was specifically sent to talk with the Jewish people (Matt 15:24). However, are you suggesting that EVERYTHING Jesus said before to his resurrection is not applicable to Christians (or just somethings)? If so, that’s a significant amount of the Gospels that would be considered “non-applicable” to us today. Jesus model prayer, suggesting topics to pray about including the sanctification of the Father’s name (YHWH), the coming of his Kingdom, his will to be done on earth, receiving our daily bread, forgiving our trespasses, being forgiving towards others all seem to basic to the Christian faith. Given you don’t pray for forgiveness of your sins, do you abstain from the other topics on this list? I am doing further research on your position to see it from your perspective. Thanks.

        • Sam, thank you for your graceful and humble approach to this discussion.

          To answer your question, no I don’t believe EVERYTHING Jesus said before His resurrection is not applicable to Christians. I’m not even suggesting that it’s MOST things. But I AM suggesting that we must think about WHO He was talking to, for what purpose, and how it applies to us today before we adopt it as normative for Christians in this age.

          Jesus attended synagogue and celebrated Passover. Should we do that?

          Jesus told the rich young ruler to sell everything he had, and give the money to the poor. Should we do that?

          And for the record, I do pray for the forgiveness of my sins (I never said I don’t… I said it’s not necessary once we have been saved, and that our sin is not powerful enough to overcome the blood of Christ), even though I know I’m already forgiven… but I do so from a place of love for my Father, not because I fail to take him at His word (“For I will be merciful to their unrighteousness, and their sins and their lawless deeds[a] I will remember no more.” Hebrews 8:12)

          Any time we hurt or disappoint someone we truly love, do our hearts not burn with remorse? Even so, my salvation is never in doubt. Nor my access to the Father.

          The whole point is that the Law set requirements we could not meet, and the New Covenant grant us Grace. Grace is the only way we can hope to not just obey the commandments but be transformed so that our behavior spontaneously leads us to right behavior. Right believing (receiving Grace from the Lord Jesus) leads to right behavior.

          Thank you again, and peace to your house.

          • Thank you Ray. To continue our discussion, Jesus was a Jew, who was specifically sent to the house of Israel because of the promises that had been made to them. If as a nation they obeyed, the would become a kingdom of priests. (Matt 15:24; Exodus 19:5, 6)

            So, I understand your point of always looking at the context of who he was talking to. For example, I wouldn’t necessarily expect something he said in private to his Apostles to be meant specifically for me.

            “Jesus attended synagogue and celebrated Passover. Should we do that?”

            No, because that requirement was part of the Mosaic Law that was applicable only for the nation of Israel as a tutor leading to the Christ. It is not applicable to Christians today.

            “Jesus told the rich young ruler to sell everything he had, and give the money to the poor. Should we do that?”

            To your point, that was advice specifically for that young man because of what was lacking in him. No, I don’t see any command that Christians should sell everything they have to give to the poor.

            Out of a heart of humility, we understand that virtually ever day, we do (or say) things towards those close to us that we should apologize for. Even if our spouse, children, and friends are perfectly forgiving, it doesn’t hurt to continually apologize for our mistakes.

            Likewise, even though perfect forgiveness is extended through grace, it doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t make our appreciation for this free gift a matter of daily prayer by acknowledging our sins and that forgiveness continue to be extended by means of the value of the propitiatory sacrifice of Jesus.

            By forgetting to regularly focus on our sinful nature and the forgiveness that comes through grace, we risk losing our appreciation and becoming like those mentioned at Jude 4, who used grace as an excuse for bad behavior.

            Like any loving Father, he simply wants his children to listen, obey, and be blessed by benefiting themselves by applying his divine wisdom in the way we should walk. (Isa 48:17)

  4. Thank you, Ray, for sharing this. Please continue with your faith podcasts. I was encouraged by what you said and also motivated to share your message with friends. It is a message that I feel is becoming increasingly more important in our society. Blessings to you!

  5. Thank you, Ray! I believe what you taught is a foundational truth that we constantly need to hear. It was exactly what I needed today.
    As a believer, I find it puzzling that so many people believe our faith in Jesus should be separated out of our lives when it comes to work and business. Thank you for walking out your faith in this area of your life. I hope it inspires more of us to do the same!