Ancient Business Wisdom

One of the wisest and richest men of all times opens up the treasures of his wisdom for us in Ecclesiastes. For the past few days I’ve been admiring three of these gems from chapter 11.

Ship your grain across the sea; after many days you may receive a return. Invest in seven ventures, yes, in eight; you do not know what disaster may come upon the land. (Ecclesiastes 11:1-2)

Got a Pebble in Your Shoe?

Have you ever had a pebble in your shoe? From time to time I’ll be out hiking and a pebble flips up and lands in my boot. Of course, I could stay home and sit on the couch and avoid the possibility of getting a pebble in my boot, but then I’d miss out on so much enjoyment in life!

Instead, I choose to go out hiking and occasionally get a pebble in my boot. Sometimes, if I’m in a hurry, I try to ignore the pebble. And before I know it, this tiny particle of rock or twig is causing me to walk with a limp. This bothersome pebble is irritating, annoying and impairing my ability to walk and enjoy the beauty around me

Going the Extra Mile

This is a guest post by Rob Fischer. I first met Rob when he was the executive pastor of the church I attended. We have since become friends and spiritual partners. Rob is now a Certified Leadership Coach, the author of many fine books, and a freelance writer whose work I recommend highly. Rob offers free resources at the Fischer Leadership Coaching Website.
-Ray Edwards

We often employ the phrase, “Going the extra mile,” to indicate stellar customer service. Do you know where that phrase originated?

The Extra Mile Just Ahead Green Road Sign Over Dramatic Clouds and Sky.

In the first century, Roman occupation forces controlled Israel. At the time, it was common for a Roman soldier to force a resident into temporary service and carry the soldier’s gear for a distance. The locals were neither keen on the fact that a foreign nation occupied their land, nor that soldiers of this occupation force made such demands on them.

The Four Extreme Tests of Leadership

This is a guest post by Rob Fischer. Rob is a Certified Leadership Coach, the author of many fine books, and a freelance writer whose work I recommend highly. Rob offers free resources at the Fischer Leadership Coaching Website.
-Ray Edwards

Heat and pressure are two of the primary forces required to refine metal. These forces draw out the impurities of the metal. Leaders require refining too. But the heat and pressure that God uses in our lives to refine us as leaders are of a different sort than that required to refine metal.

crucible

A crucible is a pot in which molten metal is refined. Metaphorically, a crucible is an extreme test that God uses to refine us.