Get Rich Quick

Play

The phrase “get rich quick” seems to be used as if it is synonymous with “scam” or “rip off”.

Yet it isn’t necessarily so.

If we mean “scam” or “rip off”, we should say those things. But there is nothing inherently wrong with getting rich quick, is there?

I mean, which would you prefer: get rich quick, or get rich slow?

Call in your questions or comments to our new, fancy “request line” at (509) 713-2679

Click for the Podcast Audio:

Click Here

Get Ray Edwards in iTunes Podcast

The Right To Own a Bazooka

Play

There are people who think you and I should have the right to own a Bazooka, or a machine gun, or a tank.

I don’t know if they are right or not. What I do know is just because I may have the right to own a bazooka doesn’t mean it’s a good idea.

Marketing application: just because you can do something doesn’t mean you should.

As always, if you have feedback or suggestions I’d really like to hear from you.

Call in your questions or comments to our new, fancy “request line” at (509) 713-2679

Click for the Podcast Audio:

Click Here

Get Ray Edwards in iTunes Podcast

The #1 Business Fantasy

What’s the #1 business fantasy?

In my opinion, it’s something like, “Make a lot of money without doing anything.”

There’s a reason it’s called fantasy. It never happens.

Even lottery winners have to cash in their ticket (and then most of them end up just as broke as they were before winning the lottery in less than 5 years).

And of course, it’s morally wonky to expect “something for nothing”. The Apostle Paul — the guy who wrote a big chunk of the New Testament — said, “If a man will not work, he shall not eat.”

Maybe it’s time to stop fantasizing and instead go to work.

Throw Out the iPhone & Ditch the Email?

Some of the most successful people I know don’t have an e-mail account. I don’t mean that they don’t have a public e-mail account-I mean they don’t have one at all.

The same people don’t have a Blackberry or an iPhone either.

And, not surprisingly, they’re not on Facebook or Twitter.

Whenever I share these facts with colleagues or friends, I normally get a shocked reaction. The underlying attitude seems to be: you can’t be successful without those things. You’ll be out of touch!

I wonder. Perhaps being “out of touch” also means being in touch… with your own creativity, ideas, and internal leadership. Perhaps being “out of touch” means not being told what to think by the “million bright ambassadors” of self-induced ADHD.

I’m just sayin’.

What do you think? Is it possible to succeed today without being Uber-connected? Is being “out of touch” (in the way I have described here) a virtue? Or is it a sign that you are a complete and hopeless Luddite?

Watch Your Affirmations

In the past, I have scoffed at the idea of affirmations. You know, “I’m good enough, I’m smart enough, and gosh darn it, people like me.” That sort of thing.

I don’t feel that way anymore, because I have realized every human being on the planet practices affirmations. It’s simply that most of us do it unconsciously. Most of us didn’t even take the affirmations we use.

Here’s what I mean: it seems to me that most of us have certain phrases, thoughts, and thinking patterns that we inherited from our nurturing environment as we were growing up. From our parents. From our peers. From our teachers. And those phrases ring in our minds no matter how old we might be today. Some common examples:

  • “Money doesn’t grow on trees.”
  • “Look before you leap.”
  • “A penny saved is a penny earned.”
  • “Haste makes waste.”
  • “Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me.”

I’m not here to debate the truth of any of those statements, I’m just illustrating that we all have phrases we repeat to ourselves over and over throughout our lives. There are, I believe, many other such phrases (and unconscious patterns of thought) that we repeat on a daily basis. We are unaware of these patterns, for the most part. They may be subtle, or they may be quite obvious (like the examples I’ve already given).

The spooky part, at least as far as I’m concerned, is the fact that most of us didn’t choose these affirmations. We are not even aware of them. We simply accepted them without critical evaluation. You might want to let that sink in.

As a business owner or entrepreneur, you’re automatically thrust into a leadership position. Others look to you for example. Don’t you agree it’s valuable to be aware of what you are thinking, day in and day out?

Suggested exercise: pay attention to repetitive patterns in your speech and thinking today-and ask yourself whether those patterns are helpful, or perhaps not so helpful.

Comments or observations? Leave them here on this page, please!