How to Be a Business Superhero

Clark Kent is the fumbling, bumbling, mild-mannered newspaper reporter who wears the big geeky glasses. A nice guy, but not exactly a role-model for self-confidence. We can all identify with Clark, at least sometimes. But when an emergency happens, Clark tosses the glasses and sheds the business suit. Underneath the costume of the ordinary, we discover a being of extraordinary strength and power: Superman. The Man of Steel.

How to Be a Business Superhero

The “strange visitor from another planet … [who] … fights a never-ending battle for truth, justice, and the American way!”

You don’t really need me to explain Superman to you. And that’s the point of this piece. If you’d like to really amplify your marketing message, one of the best ways to do it is to become the superhero of choice for your prospects. Here’s how you do that…

Email Marketing: “I’m not dead yet!”

In a darkly amusing scene from the 1975 film Monty Python and the Holy Grail, a character hauls a cart of deceased plague victims down the street, shouting, “Bring out your dead!”. This disturbing scene is rendered amusing when a supposedly dead man raises his head and cries feebly, “I’m not dead yet. I’m feeling much better, actually.” Just like that character, email marketing may have been pronounced dead by so-called experts, but is actually “feeling much better.”

Computer knowledge

Back in 2007, I wrote a blog post entitled Email Marketing: Dead or Alive? At that time, there was much debate over whether email marketing was still viable or not. It’s interesting to me that the post could easily have been written today, as the same debate still rages, and my answer is similar to what it was then. Similar, but not exactly the same, which is why I am writing this updated post.

Even today, you can significantly increase your profits and the effectiveness of your marketing by applying these three principles of good email marketing.

3 Quick and Dirty Tips to Better Public Speaking

Today’s post is a guest post by my friend and colleague Mike Kim. I strongly recommend you check out his Brand You! marketing podcast, and his blog.

Have you ever found yourself completely enraptured by a public speaker? Or sat amazed at the sheer eloquence, power, and delivery of a gifted orator? Have you ever dreamt of doing the same only to conclude, “No way … I could never do that!” Yeah, same here.

public speech

While growing up, I marveled at great orators: the politicians, lecturers, coaches, and preachers that just seemed like they were “born with it.” Public speaking never came naturally to me, so sharing my ideas in front of people seemed like a pipe dream.

But public speaking — like any other type of communication — can be developed. The problem is we tend to focus on the discourse rather than the delivery. Both are important, so here are a few tips to improve your public speaking … they’re so simple you’ll feel like you’re cheating.

Why Your Sales Pitches Fail

My friend Carl has fallen on hard times. A few years ago, Carl was literally “rolling in the dough”, making money faster than he could spend it.

ultra-top-sales-guy-630

At that time, Carl was selling “software as a service”: customers paid a monthly subscription fee, and got access to his software. The service was very much in demand, and all Carl had to do was display his rates, answer questions on his website, and the sales rolled in.

Cross-pollination: We Need Each Other

Today’s post is a guest post written by Mike Morrell, a friend I met last year at a mastermind meeting in Nashville, Tennessee.Mike does a lot of work with authors, and co-leading an author-blogger training this summer called The Buzz Seminar.

I have a friend, Jimmy. Jimmy’s a beekeeper, and what I’ve learned from him about the behaviors of bees has also helped me understand more about creativity and productivity.

Beekeeper caring for bee colony

Bees are among the most social of the insect kingdom, it turns out – living and working together in extraordinary creativity and productivity. One of the most important things I’ve learned from Jimmy is the bee behavior of cross-pollination.