Relentless Rules That Make Cash Registers Ring

Don’t do any marketing or advertising that doesn’t make money for your business; that doesn’t make the cash register ring.

Here’s the sad news: “brand building” is a door that is pretty much closed to the small to medium-size company.

In today’s over-communicated, oversaturated marketplace, the sheer mass required to achieve brand awareness is quite simply out of financial reach for all but the biggest companies.

And one could argue that such strategies don’t always make sense for big companies either.

Here’s what does not fail: holding your advertising and marketing accountable for its own results. It doesn’t take a “rocket surgeon” to understand direct response marketing. In fact, the steps are simple:

1. Launch a marketing or advertising campaign that you can measure (phone calls completed, postcards returned, e-mails collected, sales made, etc.)

2. Observe whether this campaign results in actual dollars coming in the door.

3. If the answer to number two is “yes”, repeat the process as needed. If the answer is “no”, if dollars do not flow in the door, try something else!

Is this a bit oversimplified?

Yes, but not much.

In fact, if you were to just follow this “oversimplified” formula to the letter, you would still be a lot better off than most businesses in America.

Make this promise to yourself: I will not engage in any marketing or advertising activity unless the results of said marketing or advertising activity can be objectively measured.

Then follow through on that promise. This alone will bring you more profits.

Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic.

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4 thoughts on “Relentless Rules That Make Cash Registers Ring

  1. Actually much of the brand advertising the big companies do can be measured. And the most successful brand advertisers like Procter & Gamble measure EVERYTHING related to the brand advertising. But yes it’s expensive.

    I read somewhere that as a small business you do benefit form branding, but you are better of doing your branding on top of a tactic that brings in cash. Like adding brand building elements to all your ads, product packaging, reports, check out pages, websites, receipts, uniforms, emails, etc etc

    • I did say it works for some large companies, who can afford to pay the freight required. I still question the wisdom of it, for most of them.

      Brand as by-product of direct response campaigns? Yes.

      Brand as integral part of look and feel and subconscious cues? Yes.

      Brand as end in itself? NO.

  2. My first response was to disagree with you on this post. But, after reading your response to Simon’s comment below, I have to agree with you. Yes, “Branding” as an end in itself, does not generate cash flow.

    However, for most health care practitioners (my primary target market at this time), they have no idea how to do ANYTHING in marketing. So when we’re providing them with a new website and blog, Facebook business page, Twitter account, LinkedIn account, Email marketing newsletter, AND designing an annual marketing plan (that you can be sure will be tracked and measured), we have to start taking into account the POSITIONING in the marketplace.

    As world-class copywriter Drayton Bird says, “positioning is more important than the copy”. We talk about branding with our clients from the standpoint of “what is it that you do better than anyone else, so that we can capture that market segment?” That’s kind of our version of branding – “what is it that differentiates you from your other competitors?” “Why will people become raving fans of yours instead of someone else?” “Why you”?

    But yes, you’re right – when it comes to the actual IMPLEMENTATION of the MARKETING, we track every single thing.

    Thanks
    Andrew