Writing For Strategic Influence

Today, I’m beginning a new series on the subject of “writing for strategic influence”.

This will be of interest if you want to use the power of persuasive writing to change, improve, expand, and empower your business.

But first, I’ll need you to bear with me; it’s necessary to explain the ideas behind this new series of articles.

The time has come to move beyond our old models of writing to persuade.

In the world of old media (radio, newspaper, and television) there was a clear distinction between writing that was intended as content, and writing that was intended to be persuasive.

The “content writing” took the form of entertainment, commentary, and news; the “persuasive” forms of writing were self-promotional, advertising, and marketing.

Today, the Internet has fundamentally shifted the way we receive, process, and act upon information. The walls that separated content from marketing have not just been taken down, they have been obliterated.

Michel Fortin has written convincingly about “The Death Of The Sales Letter”. With seemingly prophetic insight, Michel accurately predicted the coming trend that would spell the end of the stunning effectiveness of traditional online “sales letter websites”. They still work-only not nearly as well as they once did. Things have changed. I recommend you read his work on this subject.

Seth Godin writes with equal prescience about the end of what he calls the “TV industrial complex”, and the advent of the “Linchpin” (the essential individual who makes a powerful difference).

These are striking insights into the new world of persuasion and marketing; and I propose to you that they are only partial glimpses of the reality that has already begun to manifest around us.

I propose that far from simply being a different way of delivering persuasive copy, the new “content marketing model” is actually a reflection of something far more significant.

No longer do our customers accept our neatly packaged, carefully honed, isolated messages about our own products and services.

In today’s world, our customers (and our prospective customers) are able to see the entire persona of an individual or company with startling accuracy. They can read praise from clients and customers, read articles written by and about the company, and see reviews from actual buyers.

They can also easily identify complaints against a person or company by doing a simple search on the Internet. They can assess how the person or company deals with such complaints. They can read the market’s response to mistakes the person or company may make in the pursuit of their business. In other words, everything is marketing, and marketing is accurate because it’s no longer possible to control it.

Thus it becomes more important than ever to think about the written words we generate, both content and marketing. In fact, my proposal is that we stop thinking about them as two different forms of writing.

I find it more useful to adopt a new paradigm: that of writing for strategic influence. Let me explain…

Let’s begin with this tacit assumption: if everything our company (or an individual, if the person is a solopreneur) engages in is in fact visible, transparent, and available for public inspection… gone are the days we could “have a marketing message”.

A new day has arrived. Instead of “having” a marketing message, we must “be” a message.

Every communication we engage in with our customers and our prospective customers should be thought of as simply writing another page in our “book of communication”.

What this means is: we have arrived at a time when accountability is no longer optional, it is simply reality.

We have to think more carefully about everything we say, and everything we do. This is a good thing. It raises the bar for all of us who work in the service of other people (and what is work, or business, if it is not being in the service of other people?).

So if every communication (answering the telephone, handing off a business card, putting out a flyer, a Google ad, a blog post, e-mail, or public talk) is in fact marketing… it becomes necessary to be conscious of what sort of influence we wish to have in the marketplace.

The marketplace is, ultimately, a marketplace of ideas. Spread your idea far and wide, and see it have an impact on the world. Good or ill, time will tell.

Ideas have always been influenced by the written word. Literature has been the medium that molds mindsets. Literature has now expanded and moved off the printed page. Literature now includes blogs, e-mails, and YouTube. Writing happens in all sorts of formats-from essays like this one, to 140 character blurbs on twitter.

It’s time to start thinking about what sort of strategic influence we wish to have on the world around us-and how we are going to craft our messages to achieve that influence.

This is “the new copywriting”.

Your life (and your business) is literally an open book. The pages, starting today, are blank, and yours to write. What story will you write?

I can’t tell you what your message should be; first, as I have already alluded to, I think you must become your message. Whatever you’re selling, you first have to live. That part, I cannot do for you.

The upcoming articles in this series will focus, instead, on the actual techniques you might wish to consider in the process of spreading your ideas through persuasive writing.

To be clear, these techniques will apply whether what you are selling are concepts, products, or services. The techniques we will discuss should be applicable whether the group you wish to influence is your family, your city government, your church, your Board of Directors, or customers and prospects.

I look forward to your feedback.

Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic.

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21 thoughts on “Writing For Strategic Influence

  1. Wow, this is exciting, Ray. Looking forward to your posts on strategic influence. I’m thinking that having adult children is a great example of what you’re discussing here. Watching their lives unfold and seeing the results of our parental influence (good and bad, on purpose and by default) we cannot avoid the stark realization that our actions speak much louder than our words. Our sphere of influence in business works the same way in the transparency of digital communication. Thanks for being out there on the edge!

  2. Hello Ray,

    Thank you for a wonderful open opinion on work ethics of today! Makes one think of “think before you speak” – the old adage.

    “A new day has arrived. Instead of “having” a marketing message, we must “be” a message.”

  3. Ray,

    This is an excellent summary of the complicated marketing world we live in. There are so many powerful one-liners in here, but I particularly love: “we have arrived at a time when accountability is no longer optional, it is simply reality.”

    People talk a lot about the convergence of PR, marketing and advertising… but I think you bring it home by saying that of a business’ operations must work together in order to deliver on brand promises, and really shape your brand in the eyes of customers and prospects.

    You also make an excellent point that this doesn’t just apply to businesses: it’s also about one’s personal brand.

    Thanks so much for sharing your thoughts and expertise,
    @laurelmackenzie

  4. I am so glad I read this now, instead of adding it to my reading list. “…thought of as simply writing another page in our “book of communication”.” This thought appears to me to be the reason for all of today’s writing. The only thing is to remember, all of our words are on a blank page and will be part of the story we will write. (“What story will you write?”)
    Thank you

  5. “Your life (and your business) is literally an open book. The pages, starting today, are blank, and yours to write. What story will you write?”

    Excellent point and definitely a motivator for those who really should start and or continue that mission.

  6. Hey, Ray! I was just thinking about this this morning, getting out of the shower! Regardless of our “online presence and message”, so far our actual client base over at http://www.HolisticPracticeDevelopment.com has come from what I would call “Old-School Relationship Marketing”. Meeting people in person. Calling people on the phone. Referrals from friends and colleagues. I was really thinking this morning that the “Direct Mail Sales Letter as a web page” thing really doesn’t work too well anymore. And I don’t think it’s just for our market – I think it’s for people across the board – because we are now dealing with an educated consumer. Unless you’re just selling junk to people who are craving junk. I totally agree with you – we need our online presence to be an EXTENSION of WHO we are Being. People can find out almost anything and everything about you, your products, and your services. I’m actually really excited about this, because the “Cream” will rise to the top! And the people below the level of integrity will remain underground. They might get rich selling junk, but they won’t be making a difference in the world and benefiting humanity.